Chamanna Cluozza

September 13, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

This post will show you our hiking trip to the Chamanna Cloazza (chamanna is the roman word for hut) in the Swiss national park.  Here is a map as a first overview:

We started our hike in Zernez which is the gateway to the national park. It is located at the upper left corner of the map. We hiked first towards south along the ridge and then into the valley to the hut (marked with the white symbol of a bed on black background). The following pictures show the hut as well as the surrounding. The weather was not that good and we had some rain on the way in. This was no big problem since we were very well prepared with our rain gear.

It would be great to sit outside and use binoculars to spot the wildlife on the other side of the valley. There are capricorn, elk, chamois, marmots, eagles, bearded vulture and much more smaller animals to see. The weather was too bad and too cold in our case to stay outside for a longer time. We limited the outside time basically to the minimal necessary. That was namely the use of the outhouse visible on the third picture behind the fence.

The night did not provide the best sleep. The hut is basically made of wood and that means that you hear everybody that has an urgent need to got to the restroom. We were lucky that it was not fully occupied due to the bad weather. There were only half the beds used and therefore half the traffic during night in the hallway and the stairs. The next day was meant to be quite nice an sunny according to the weather forecast and the staff in the hut. It turned out that both of them were wrong and dark clouds with some blue wholes were in the sky and the valley was quite dark as you can see:

We nevertheless started the second part of our trip after a hearty breakfast. We decided to take another way out over a pass. You see it on the map to the east of the hut towards parking number three (P3). At parking three we can take the post van back to our car. You might see it on the map that the trail goes basically strait up to the pass and then strait down to the parking. This means that we will claim quite a lot and we were not so sure about the weather. We started with our rain gear ready to be used at any time:

The trail is very well marked with signs and post that contain as well the estimated time of the hike. We took a white-red-white path that means it is suitable for regular hiking where the white-blue-white would require advance alpine skills. The temperature in the morning was around zero degrees celsius and we had to wear some protection as you can already see on the picture to the left. After about half an hour we saw the first chamois quite close to the trail (but still a bit too far away for the iPhone camera):

The trail continues steep up to the pass and the snow and ice came closer and closer. The wind became freezing and we had to wear all our clothes despite the fact that the clime was rather strenuous. 

The top of the pass was then covered with snow and we had to take care that we were not sliding.

Short after the pass was a large meadow and some marmots were still out (lower right side of the picture):

The view from top was gorgeous but also a bit scary. We realized that there is quite a long way all down the lake with the amazing color.

It was very interesting to hike through the different vegetation zones. On top was only gras and then came small bushes before the forest started. This part of Switzerland has a lot of sun and is rather dry compared to the rest. But it still very green and humid compared to the Sierra Nevada in California. 

The next picture shows view from the lake towards the pass and the weather got better and better:

Our final destination was the hotel Il Fuorn that is the only hotel within the national park. 

Now you have some impressions about our Swiss national park with the forest, meadows, high peaks, glaciers, wonderful lakes and lots of wildlife. The brown bear that enters from Italy was seen as well in those valleys but unfortunately not this year. 


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